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Rainbow Six: Siege

Ubisoft details Reverse Friendly Fire system in Siege

This will reflect friendly fire damage back on the offender after one incident, and victims can flag if it was intentional or not.

When we were looking ahead to Year 4 of Rainbow Six: Siege after a presentation by Ubisoft at the Six Invitational event in Montreal last month, one area they wanted to address was toxicity, and specifically team killing in the game. Now a new blog post has revealed some details about how this system will work, the goal being to "contain the impact of players abusing the friendly fire mechanic, while maintaining a degree of flexibility for accidents."

The Reverse Friendly Fire system will roll out on the ranked and casual playlists on the test servers before releasing live, so that Ubisoft can collect feedback and data on how it works. Essentially, with this system, a warning message pops up on your screen when you shoot a teammate or a hostage, with the same happening if you use your gadget to hurt a teammate.

After a player commits their first validated team kill, all further damage on teammates or hostage is then reflected back, similar to getting killed in Call of Duty's hardcore modes. Reflected damage will affect the gadget, if this is being used. A message pop up will tell the offender that Reverse Friendly Fire has been activated, with all other players notified of this change as well via the kill feed.

On the victim side of things, the kill cam lets you valdiate whether they were intentionally team killed or not. If this is confirmed to be intentional, Reverse Friendly Fire will stay active, although if it's marked as unintentional, it'll be deactivated. If a decision isn't given, it'll still active by default.

It's important to note that a player won't be kicked, but Reverse Friendly Fire will stay active for the match, and that sanctions may occur after multiple offences as Ubisoft continues to track team kills.

Again, this is only part of the developer's goal to "address toxicity as we proceed into Year 4 and beyond," and they encourage players to feedback to them.

Can this system work to discourage team killing?

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Rainbow Six: Siege