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God Eater 3

God Eater 3

Bandai Namco has served up a game made of ingredients that somehow cannibalise one another.

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The terminology in God Eater 3 is in a world of its own, and it even feels a little complicated to explain the game/s in our own words. The series tells the story of a conflict between the weak human race and a superior biological life form. Independently acting cells, which decompose everything they come into contact with, have invaded Earth and release poisonous ash as part of their attack, ash which now covers the remnants of our dying world.

These cells can also combine themselves to form huge creatures too strong for us to fight - how can you possibly defeat something that can't even be touched? Those who remain, however, have discovered an answer to this riddle and pay a high price to be able to counteract the threat. The so-called AGE - Adaptive God Eaters - are themselves the result of a series of inhumane experiments, and we play one member of this special unit in the latest action-game by Bandai Namco.

God Eater 3God Eater 3

From the very beginning, the game makes it quite clear to us who and what we are in the eyes of the remaining humans, despite the great sacrifices the AGE must make. In this sense, God Eater 3 tells the classic hero story of a character who transcends the capabilities of his own kind and becomes the hope of everyone else. Unfortunately, the title doesn't really seem to care too much about the telling of its own story, which is why there are few narrative beats to show for a game that offers around 25 to 30 hours of gameplay.

So much of the narrative is completely ignored by the gameplay. The reason for this is the old-fashioned mission design that comes straight from the early Monster Hunter games. There is just one sole mission type that, despite a certain level of variance, can only be played to a very limited extent. While God Eater 3 tries to tell a rousing, emotional story with all too human problems, the game keeps us slaying giant monsters called Aragami and there's a disconnect between story and gameplay.

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God Eater 3God Eater 3

The narrative is broken up in a number of places by randomly-positioned hunting missions, and we got frustrated when we had to play through further assignments in order to experience the next story beat. On the other hand, our gaming experience was also marked by the fact that there is no narrative progression at all until the next set of frivolous scenarios have been completed. It's a pity that God Eater 3 doesn't want to provide a coherent gaming experience and does so little with its own strengths. The game rarely succeeds in conveying tension or meaning, and when it does these moments never last long. The all too fragmented mixture of gameplay and story is irreparably split, which might even leave die-hard fans unsatisfied at the end of the day.

Aficionados of the series surely know most of this already, since the story has always been a disguise to draw newcomers into the engaging gameplay spiral. This still works, though, as we spawn in one of only 10 maps and must kill randomly assigned enemies. There are pre-determined resource locations, a timer ticking towards our game over, and a set of mission rewards in case we succeed, which in turn flow into the creation or expansion of our arsenal.

God Eater 3God Eater 3
God Eater 3God Eater 3