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Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown

Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown

Ace Combat series just arrived on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. And it does so with a game that is faithful to its origins.

The Ace Combat series, which came along in 1995, offered something great. It made the control of super-technological fighters extremely amusing and accessible. If you have approached a flight simulator like Falcon 4 or a hybrid game like Jane's USAF, you have certainly had to deal with long learning phases and manuals that forced you to learn the devilries that allow a fighter-bomber to hit a bicycle-sized target from an altitude of 15,000 feet. For the air force nerds, this is very exciting. For everyone else, however, this is an insurmountable obstacle that requires too much dedication to be truly appreciated.

Ace Combat, on the other hand, is on the opposite end of the flight simulation spectrum: it's a game that can be learned in a matter of minutes, which instantly throws us into aerial dogfighting, providing you with an exaggerated amount of missiles and more targets than the ones you can find in a duck-shooting gallery. Ace Combat, in a word, is pure adrenaline.

The seventh main episode of the series brings it up to date on modern consoles such as Xbox One and PlayStation 4, and with the latter, it also comes in the territory of virtual reality. We must admit, however, that the series has not seen huge developments, even in this current-gen incarnation, and as soon as you put yourself in command of a fighter in Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown, you will immediately feel at ease.

Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown
Ace Combat 7: Skies UnknownAce Combat 7: Skies Unknown

We could say that Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown is a game that does not waste time. It takes only a few minutes from the beginning of the first mission until you are locking on an enemy aircraft, pronouncing the fateful "Fox Two" to signal the launch of a missile and, finally, watch the spectacular and smoky explosions. Just a few minutes, and here you are at the helm of a plane whose mission is to hit targets on the ground using guided bombs, and even in this you will only need a little intuition to become in a few minutes a real ace. Why wasting your time with a tutorial on evasive manoeuvres when you do not have to do anything but let yourself be overwhelmed by instinct and start tight turns that would make Tom Cruise faint because of the excessive G force? Ace Combat is all this: intuition, ease of use, lots of fun.

As usual, the game is made up of a long campaign (20 missions) that takes us into a fictitious war, which represents a summa of the greatest military conflicts of the twentieth century and, why not, of the post-9/11 wars. In the game, we play a pilot named Trigger, whose story quickly takes a very bad turn as our hero is forced to fly into potential suicide missions, and this is where the game becomes interesting. If Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown begins in a simple, almost trivial manner, the missions later become increasingly difficult and intricate.

Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown
Ace Combat 7: Skies UnknownAce Combat 7: Skies Unknown