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Concrete Genie

Here's a glimpse into Concrete Genie's story

A new trailer shows how we can bring our hometown back to life with art, and the game's also getting PSVR modes as well.

Pixelopus is working to bring us the story of creativity let loose in their game Concrete Genie, and in a recent PlayStation Blog post creative director Dom Robilliard shared a brand new trailer giving us a taste of the story, while also speaking about the narrative in a bit more detail.

The game tells the story of Ash, who is a bullied child using creativity to make the world a better place. His hometown of Denska was once a busy town by the sea, but Ash needs to fight the Darkness that's taken over by painting Denska and bringing the life back.

He'll do this with the use of his magic paintbrush that can provide Living Paint, capable of making living landscapes and creatures called Genies. Each piece of art is your own in the game, and you can paint on any wall, in turn creating Genies that will help Ash to solve puzzles and gain abilities.

"We've invested so much effort into making these mechanics easy and intuitive for players to express themselves. We've had the opportunity to demo Concrete Genie at events around the globe and have been blown away by the response to gameplay so far," Robilliard explains.

What's more is that we also find out that Concrete Genie will include two PSVR modes alongside the base game, with Jeff Brown and Dave Smith working alongside Pixelopus to make this happen. More details on these modes are promised soon, but the game itself will be available in autumn exclusive for the PS4.

Are you excited to flex your creativity?

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Concrete Genie

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Concrete GenieScore

Concrete Genie

REVIEW. Written by Sam Bishop

"It's a dismal journey through dark and repetitive environments doing equally repetitive jobs to get the plot moving."



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