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review

Final Fantasy XV

After a decade of waiting, we're finally ready to offer our verdict on FFXV.

It has been ten years since we were at E3 2006 and Square Enix announced Final Fantasy XIII Versus, and since then it has been a roller-coaster back and forth between hope and despair. Back then it was still quite unusual to see spin-offs of Final Fantasy, and Final Fantasy X was the only one with a proper sequel, namely X-2.

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We were never particularly fond of Final Fantasy XIII, and our interest in Final Fantasy XIII Versus died because it was something we simply didn't want any more of. Ten years is a mercilessly long time in the world of gaming, and when Versus was announced, the PlayStation 3 had not even been released. Things then went quiet until just a few years ago, at which point the game changed name, and Final Fantasy XV was shown in all its splendour.

Final Fantasy XV
The protagonists are quick to like, and Japanese speaking is recommended, as the English voice actors are not convincing.

Even that didn't make us particularly hungry though. A story about a Japanese boy band chilling on a road trip didn't really come in line with our expectations of what Final Fantasy should be, and so, at least on our part, expectations continued to be quite low. That was until last spring, when it began to dawn on us all how extensive this game really was and what producer Hajime Tabata wanted to achieve.

Now we can see that, yes, this is true Final Fantasy to the core. Behind the initially second most unlikable protagonist of the series so far (the unbearable Tidus is in a league of his own) hides an adventure that has much more in common with the early games in the series than we dared dream before. It's a return to the more light-hearted approach where the protagonists stumble into something bigger, becoming an accidental hero and rising to the task at hand.

Final Fantasy XV
It is an open world game, but this time the fighting takes place seamlessly.

The fact that the four protagonists aren't particularly likeable at first is quickly forgotten once you get to know WWE-lookalike Gladiolus Amicitia, fun loving Prompto Argentum, and clever cook Ignis Scientia. They're really great characters and the interactions between the four of them adds a lot to the experience. Even as we walked off for our first adventure we were struck by the chitchat, the shouts of encouragement, with the group behaving as if they were actually four happy friends on an adventure.

Before starting on your journey with them, we'd recommend that you check out the anime Brotherhood, which will increase your enjoyment of the game considerably. That way you know which personalities the main characters have, why they react as they do in certain situations, and who they really are. Some of you won't be keen on this at all and obviously you can enjoy the game without, but it really adds something to have seen the Brotherhood episodes, which are five pieces totalling approximately one hour.

Final Fantasy XV
Cid returns to the series, this time as the grandfather of the mechanic Cindy.

Another thing you should do is pay a visit to the Training mode. Unfortunately, like many Japanese games, the instructions are somewhat shoved down your throat and it could have been done a lot more cleverly, as the system is so sophisticated that it pays to keep track of the subtle controls, especially because you will fight an awful lot in this adventure.

One thing that we immediately want to lavish praise on is the soundtrack. The Final Fantasy series is arguably best in class in this area, and there's obviously an extremely high standard to live up to. With Nobuo Uematsu out of the game, there was a heavy responsibility on his successor, Yoko Shimomura, and fortunately she delivers. Several times we heard small hints of famous Final Fantasy arrangements, enough to calm us in the knowledge that this is a true Final Fantasy game, even though everything else is freshly prepared. Simply put, we couldn't ask for more.

Final Fantasy XV
The game world could have had more to discover, although the environments of the game are beautiful.

When driving around in the car you also have access to the radio, from which you can listen to classic Final Fantasy songs, which was a nice little touch, making the many and often long car journeys more enjoyable, and the fact that Noctis and the gang keep busy (by reading books, playing games, thinking out loud, and having the odd singalong) also helps. Seat belts are obviously not a priority in this world, as Prompto can sit backwards on the front seat to talk with Noctis, who himself can jump up and sit on the frame of the car.

A vibrant game world has been offered up for us to explore this time around. Everywhere you go you can see enormous monsters and peaceful herbivores that are just waiting around to provide you with sweet XP, however, you can't simply go anywhere, like you can in The Elder Scrolls. Instead, you unlock the world bit by bit, slowly revealing more content, and there is always a reason to return to old areas to face things you had either missed or were too low level to fight.

Final Fantasy XV
Make sure to collect ingredients and eat regularly, as food provides buffs for fighting.

This is a system that suits Final Fantasy very well and actually reminded us of Final Fantasy IV a little bit, but with everything infinitely upgraded. For example, you sometimes face more than you can handle in battles, such as when we met an early Daemon during a late evening drive. We quickly realised that we would not have a chance to win, deciding instead to make a run for it and escape. Since Final Fantasy XV has monsters in its open world you can theoretically run away from fights, but there is no guarantee that your escape will be successful, as the monster may just follow you. It felt just like the epic Final Fantasy Active Time Battles of old, where we would try to escape but couldn't.

Fighting is otherwise a different story. Like any other role-playing game, Final Fantasy has focused more towards action-based combat. Square Enix has had a lot of time to experiment over the past decade, but they never really got it right despite big changes in each new entry. However, in Final Fantasy XV the combat system fits like a glove, this thanks to good counter attacks, smooth selection between fighting styles/magic, and fun special attacks.

The magic system reminds us vaguely of Final Fantasy VIII, with you drawing magic from your surroundings (rather than from the enemy). You can throw a weak attack, but using more (up to 99) means your attacks become all the more powerful. It does admittedly force you to dabble a little with the menus to use magic as you want to, but generally it's a well-functioning system. In addition, they have preserved some age-old Final Fantasy rules, like attacks from behind, therefore making it wise to determine the angle from which the enemy is best approached and then trying to turn them around.

Final Fantasy XV
Final Fantasy XV
Final Fantasy XV
Final Fantasy XV
Final Fantasy XV
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