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review

The Elder Scrolls Online

We've now spent 12 days playing The Elder Scrolls Online, and now we're finally ready to offer our verdict on the ambitious MMORPG take on the popular Elder Scrolls franchise.

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We've cursed more over the course of the last twelve days than in our entire adult lives. Lines have been crossed and less than human sounds have been uttered as our fists have come crashing down on our desk. A metal letter tray from IKEA has been twisted beyond recognition. Reviewing The Elder Scrolls Online has been trying, because in spite of enjoying our time in Tamriel with other people, it's painfully clear that Zenimax Online Studios weren't able to finish the game in time for launch.

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Now it should be noted that the genre is such that a few bugs always seem to linger. When you create a massive open-world populated by massive numbers of players and there's a subscription fee - it's sort of implied that it's a work in progress. But The Elder Scrolls Online stands out from the crowd as far as delivering an unfinished experience at launch goes.

The Elder Scrolls Online
Zenimax Online Studios was founded in 2007 and have been working on the game ever since.

Never before have we encountered such issues with a game client. It's like owning an old and well maintained classic car, as when The Elder Scrolls finally works the way it's supposed to, the time we spend with it is largely enjoyable, but at the same time there's always that feeling that something could break at any time.

We were invited to try an early beta version last summer, and as such we knew we shouldn't expect a classic Elder Scrolls experience from the game. The emphasis is on "Online" rather than "The Elder Scrolls", and even if components such as the iconic compass, a levelling system where you advance by doing, and dialogue choices that impact the world around us - it doesn't take us long to realise the structure here is that of tried and tested MMORPGs.

The Elder Scrolls Online
Players have suffered through a launch full of bugs and glitches. Dying during a boss battle can result in having to do other quests until the developers have sorted the issue.

It becomes obvious as we've made it through the obligatory starting phase where we, as a Dark Elf Nightblade, escape from a prison with a blind man and then teleport into the greater Tamriel. Unlike other Elder Scrolls titles we cannot explore freely at our own pace. Instead we're more or less trapped in a closed-in terrority until our character has reached a specific level. This forces us to play for hours in an environment that we don't like, grinding on quests that we're not emotionally invested in, only to gather enough strength to progress to the next zone.

Thankfully we're not set in our ways and we quickly learn to accept the somewhat more linear structure, but unfortunately it doesn't end there, as there are more things to annoy you if you want this game with Elder Scrolls in its title to play like other games with Elder Scrolls in their titles. We can no longer pick up things and move them, the physics engine is completely replaced by one that's of a more classic MMO type, the towns appear devoid of life, and the brilliant narrative has been replaced by short, predictable quest chains with anxious NPCs that are quickly forgotten.

The Elder Scrolls Online
Nice puddle somewhere in Tamriel.

Short, predictable quest chains, that often can't be complete as a result of bugs. Here's an example: The other day we ventured out to a ruin so we could place a crystal on a pedestal so one character would leave the soul of another character alone (sorry, about the hazy recollection, but we've already forgotten most of the details). The road there could have been hard as it was lined by troops of ghosts, but as luck would have we were joined by a few other players on the same quest.

The enemies fell in mere seconds before we reached a door that separated us into an instance each. Some bosses you can only face alone or with a formal group of players, while other battles can be joined at any point for a more spontaneous battle. This boss proved too difficult for us, and despite dying in the last room of the whole ruin we were reanimated at the closest "wayshrine" a few hundred metres away in the nearby forest.

The Elder Scrolls Online
A fire attack lights up an ugly enemy in a dark cave. In the background a ray from a Skyshard.

We had to start from the beginning, but this time without any assistance as the others must have done better against the boss. Inside the ruins the enemies were back, and when we finally reached the endboss again, he decided to stop fighting and lay down flat on the ground. There was no way to kill him and no way to leave the room. So we were left with no option but hit ctrl+alt+del, kill the client, reboot and take on a different quest, full of frustration after our loss of progression.

A lot of the cleared quests have dramatic impact on the world around us. In a nearly empty village the population have taken ill and we accept the task of finding out what's behind the outbreak. It turns out that a blacksmith has poisoned the drinking water with venom from a spider as she was the losing party in a love triangle. She admits her actions and runs off into the forest. Some time later she returns with a small army, and once it's been dealt with and people start to return to health, the empty town goes through several stages until ultimately ending up a rather enjoyable place to return to when it's time to buy or sell items.

The Elder Scrolls Online
By collecting three Skyshards you gain an ability point. One of several ways exploration is rewarded.

In similar fashion we happen upon a town where there is simply too much thunder and lightning for it to be considered safe by any definition. Turns out a mage is conjuring up the bad weather at the top of a tower so we go there and stop him by hurling from his tower to the ground. The town quietens down, traders venture out and open their stalls and it feels like we've made a difference. And we did so in our own way.

After a few hours of gaming we notice that it's at its most enjoyable when we're not looking at the quest journal or the map, but instead simply set out in a random direction and stumble upon the adventures. It's never as free and seamless as in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim (once again, because we're locked into locations that match our level), but there is almost always something to discover or experience, whether it's a wormhole that drops in enemies from another dimension, or simply a locked chest to pick.

The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
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The Elder Scrolls Online
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The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
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The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
The Elder Scrolls Online
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